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Showing posts from September, 2016

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Miscellany

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?
Today, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 focuses on various handy bits of information, all of which have to do with the letter "D."
Decades
This is something people get wrong constantly and probably ranks in the top five grammar nerd pet peeves. When punctuating decades, use an apostrophe to indicate the numerals that are left out. Add an "s" to pluralize. No, I repeat no apostrophe before the "s." 
Examples
The 1980s had some great music, especially the post-punk, alternative bands.She loved '80s music.World War II ended in the mid-1940s.
Denali
Did you know the tallest peak in North America used to be called Mount McKinley? It measures 20,310 feet.
Differ from, differ with
The AP Stylebook states that to differ from means to be unlike. To differ with means to disagree.
Discreet…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: I 'C' U

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?
Today, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 focuses on word groups that begin with the letter "C". Some are homophones, and some have tricky spelling, but all of them can cause writers and editors headaches. 

Cancel, canceled, canceling, but cancellation


Why? Who knows, but that's how it is. Best to just memorize it or at least remember it's something you need to look up before you press send.
Carat, caret, karat

Not to be confused with carrot of the eating kind, these three words mean completely different things despite sounding alike.

A carat is the weight of diamonds. It equals up to 200 milligrams or about 3 grains, according to AP Style. A caret is a proofreader's mark that looks like this ^ and is used to insert a word or phrase into a sentence. Jewelry lovers will know that a karat is t…

A Groovy Kind of Sale

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Just wanted to let you know A Groovy Kind of Love e-books are on sale for just 99¢ from now until Thursday, Sept. 22 on all platforms—Kindle, Nook, iTunes, Kobo, and Smashwords. That's a 75% savings!

Paperbacks are also only $11.99 on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Did you know? A Groovy Kind of Love received an Honorable Mention in the 2015 Chicago Writers' Association Book of the Year awards and was a 2015 Big Al's Books & Pals Readers' Choice Award Nominee. Right now, it has 4.5 stars on Amazon.



Here's what some reviewers have said.

"A Groovy Kind of Love was JUST what I needed…hippies, unrequited love, crazy/high families,  mysterious exes from the past, foreign travel, tragedy. Really, what more could a reader ask for? This book is The Odd Couple meets Beauty and the Beast with a touch of Nicholas Sparks tragedy thrown in for good measure."   — The Republican Herald book blog

"...you realize this is about true love. Not teen love. Not young love…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Muslim Edition

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

This week, Muslims all over the world celebratedEid-al-Adha, one of two official holidays. Eid-al-Adha, known as “Sacrifice Feast,” is the most important Islamic holiday and recalls the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim (Abraham to Christians and Jews) to sacrifice his son. Some people slaughter sheep or cattle, then distribute part of the meat to the poor and eat the rest. 
There is so much misinformation about Islam and Muslims floating around, I thought today would be a good day to set the record straight and feature terms that we have all heard, but might not know exactly what they mean or how to spell them. 
First off, Islam is the religion of more than one billion people. The followers of Islam are called Muslims. Their holy book is the Quran. The place of worship is a mosque, and the holy day of th…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: To B or not to B

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





Is there anything more embarrassing than using the wrong word? It happens to us all, of course, but it's also a surefire way for you and your writing to lose credibility. Today, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 focuses on some tricky word pairings, which start with the letter "B," that can trip up even the best of us.
Baloney, bologna
Baloney is ridiculous or foolish talk, nonsense.
And although the dictionary lists bologna as a variation of baloney, AP Style states bologna is the word for sausage or lunchmeat. 
Beside, besides
Beside means at the side of. 
Besides means as well or in addition to.
Biannual, biennial
Biannual is twice a year.
Biennial is every two years. 
Boats, ships
Boat refers to any small watercraft. Ship means a large, seagoing vessel, with the exception of a ferryboat, whic…

Fighting for Your Writing

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Last Friday, I was a guest blogger over at Wow! Women on Writing's blog, The Muffin. I discussed the issue of fighting for your writing time and space, something that isn't always easy with a family.

Here's the link.

Friday Speak Out!: You will do anything to save your kids or your partner, but what about your writing?