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Showing posts from November, 2016

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Which, What, Who?

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

Today, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 takes on the questions from Fi and angel011 from my previous blog. 

Fi wrote: 
Here's a question for you. I tend to use dashes (-) in my blog posts to link ideas. Is this correct or should I be using something else?

Hi, Fi. 
I consulted three sources for your answer.  
The Associated Press Stylebook 2016 states dashes are used “to signal an abrupt change in thought” and sudden breaks in a sentence, along with formulating a series within a phrase. It cautions against “overusing dashes to set off phrases when commas would suffice.”
Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition dictates dashes should be used “to separate a dependent clause from an independent clause.” 
Strunk and White’s Elements of Style advises the following. “Use a dash to set off an abrupt break or interruptio…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Thanksgiving Edition

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

I tried to find grammar issues with Thanksgiving words, but there are very few besides cornucopia, which is spelled with a surprising “u,” and that the plural of potato takes an “e,” so it is potatoes. 
When I was young, I loved the story of Thanksgiving. Our teachers omitted many crucial details about the zealousness and cruelty of the Pilgrims, and I was led to believe everything was lovely as the pilgrims and Native Americans came together for a unity meal. It’s irresponsible to whitewash history, so click here to read what really happened.
Ugh.
As an adult, I’ve come to fashion the holiday as a time to give thanks for what we have. 
Being a writer and editor means I get to work from home, which is pretty great most of the time. The one drawback is that it can be a little lonely with no lunches with co-…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: What the H...?

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?
This week, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 explores various grammar and word issues that begin with the letter “H.” And please remember "an" before the word historic. It's not a historic (fill in the rest of the sentence), it's an historic (fill in the rest of the sentence). Grammar lovers everywhere thank you.
Hangar/hanger
Hangar refers to airplane hangars, while hanger spelled with an “e” is the word for clothes hangers.
Hanged/hung
Always a tricky one, hanged is the “past participle of hang only in its transitive form when referring to the killing of a human being by suspending the person by the neck,” according to the Chicago Manual of Style. However, if the death is not intended or likely, or if the person is suspended by a body part other than the neck, CMS goes on to state, hung is c…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Questions?

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

I recently received an email from a writer friend of mine. I thought it could be something you might run into with your own writing, so I'm sharing it here today.

Question

Hi Karen,
I'm really enjoying your Grammarphobe posts, but wondered whether you could help me out in advance with a "W" problem! 
I'm getting mixed opinions on whether it is Wi-Fi, WiFi or wifi. Maybe all three are correct in the right place, but this if for a novel. Can you help?
Many thanks in advance.
Mel 
Mel ParishFood for the author: Books and Travel

Answer
Mel, I double checked with both the Associated Press Stylebook 2016 and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary
It's Wi-Fi. Always, no matter what you are writing.
Hope that helps.

If you have any questions, drop me an email at karen@karenberner.com. 



I'm on Location

Author Lidy Wilks invited me to guest blog at her wonderful site "Paving My Author's Road...One Writing Step at a Time" today. I'm discussing five grammar mistakes and how to fix them.

Click here to read.

We met through the awesome SheWrites website that brings women writers together to share ideas and network.

Lidy's participating in NaNoWriMo, so wish her good luck! She's the author of the chapbook, Can You Catch My Flow?, but poetry is not her only genre. She is currently writing a contemporary romance, as well as a young adult supernatural book. She lives in Virginia with her husband and two children.


Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Oh, Gee!

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

Today, Editing for Grammarphobes tackles issues with words that begin with the letter "G," not anything glamorous or grandiloquent, but good to know nonetheless. See what I did there? *wink*

Gatsbyesque
Did you know that was a real word? I thought it was a colloquialism bandied about in English class, but no, it was added to the dictionary in 1977. The official definition is "resembling or characteristic of the title character or world of the novel The Great Gatsby." Yet another way classic literature affects our language.

Grisly, grizzly
Grisly means horrifying and repugnant, according to The Associated Press Stylebook 2016. It does not have an extra "s," like some think. 
Grizzly is a bear. AP states it can also be a word for grayish. 

Group
Even though it is means a bunch of …