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Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Ready? Okay!

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



Remember when people used to write, with a pen, I mean, as in penmanship? I was that dork who spent countless hours practicing getting my name just so. I haven’t thought about the physical act of cursive writing for awhile. Discussing the letter “K” this week brought back a wave of memories of fourth grade in Miss Alesh’s class, thick-lined paper, and practice, practice, practice, since I probably spent the most time on “K” and “W,” intertwining them into my own, self-designed monogram. I never said I was popular.

Anyhow, let’s see what’s up with words that begin with the letter “K.”

K
“K” is used in references to modem speed transmissions, as well as statistical references to kilometers, and to represent thousands in monetary amounts, according to the Associated Press Stylebook 2016.

Examples
George bought …

Jumping Back In

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?


My husband’s birthday last week signaled the official end of the holidays in the Berner home. Time to get back into our regular schedules and that means Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 every Wednesday. 
We ended our alphabet series in 2016 with the letter “I,” so let’s jump back in with “J.”

Jealousy, envy
More often than not, jealousy and envy are used synonymously, but according to The Chicago Manual of Style, that’s not correct. 
Jealousy, it states, “connotes feelings of resentment toward another, particularly in matters relating to intimate relationships.” On the other hand, envy, CMS notes, “refers to covetousness of another’s advantages, possessions, or abilities. 
Jibe, jive
Jibe means to shift direction in nautical terms, but it also is the colloquial word for “to agree,” such as in the following examp…