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Showing posts from August, 2017

Debugging Your Writing

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Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



About six years ago, Sue Sommer wrote a handy little book on grammar and spelling based on her experience as a high school Honors English and creative writing teacher. A past winner of the Golden Bell Award for Excellence in Teaching, Sommer also had worked as a magazine editor and proofreader. She knows her stuff. The book, The Bugaboo Review: A Lighthearted Guide to Exterminating Confusion About Words, Spelling, and Grammar, is one of the resources I keep on my desk.
In The Bugaboo Review, Sommer has a page on absolutes, words that cannot have degrees attached to their use, meaning they should be used without adverb modifiers, such as most, very, or quite. Absolutes are the "be all, end all," so to speak. 
"Don't use phrases such as more unique, very favorite, most perfect, very final d…

5 Ways to Edit Like a Pro

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



You have completed your novel, article, or white paper. Now it's time to put all of your grammatical ducks in a row. I know most of you hate this part, but it is crucial to your success. Nothing is perfect. There will always be some errors; we are human, after all. But, as writers, it is our responsibility to use our tools of the trade correctly. These are just some of the things I do before I hand anything in.

1. Spelling

Do not trust spell check. It often misses homophones, which is one of those mistakes that can make a brilliant storyteller look like a complete moron. Check dialogue and slang terms. Make sure character names are spelled consistently. Double check place names. Be on the lookout for red flag words, as well as common mistakes, such as your/you’re and to/too/tw…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Etymology Fun

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER



Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?

Fellow word nerds, it's time for an etymology post. Do you know how these words and phrases came to be?





Throw down the gauntlet

A gauntlet is a chain mail glove worn with medieval armor to protect one’s hand. In the days of chivalry and combat, when a gauntlet was thrown to the ground, it meant that knight was challenging his opponent to a fight. If the gauntlet was picked up by the opposing knight, the challenge was accepted.



Palace

According to an interesting blog by the Oxford Royale Academy*, the word palace has its origins from Rome. "It comes from one of Rome’s famous Seven Hills, the Palatine, upon which the emperor resided in what grew into a sprawling and opulent home," according to the blog. It goes on to say that in Latin, the Palatine Hill was called the…