Posts

Showing posts from December, 2017

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: End of the Year Quickie—Gross vs. Net

Image
Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?






Let's close out 2017 with one Editing for Grammarphobes quickie, shall we?

Since tax time is just around the corner, do you know the difference between gross and net?

Gross income is the amount of salary or wages paid to an individual by an employer before any deductions are taken out.

Net income is the residual amount of earnings after all expenses have been deducted.

Thank you all for spending time with me this year. I have known many of you through this blog since its inception in 2010. Can you believe it? I truly treasure you all. It's nice to know you have friends all over the world.

Thank you to my new EFG Digest subscribers. It's been an exciting year expanding Editing for Grammarphobes and sharing grammar facts with you. I'm so glad you're a part of the …

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: What's the Origin of 'Xmas?'

Image
Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER

Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?




With Christmas only five days away, I thought we’d discuss some words and phrases associated with the holiday and the origins behind them.



Christmastime

The Associated Press Stylebook 2016 (AP) states Christmastime should be all one word.


Christmas tree

AP suggests to lowercase the word tree and other seasonal terms paired with Christmas, including Christmas card, Christmas wreath, and Christmas carol. The exception is the National Christmas Tree. Why? Probably because it's an official title. That's my guess.


Reindeer

Reindeer is both a singular and plural word. Every time someone uses reindeers, an angel loses its wings. Just kidding. But seriously, don’t do it.


Magi

According to the Bible, the Magi are the wise men who visited baby Jesus. This visit is commemorated by Chri…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Can You Name All Seven Jewish Holy Days?

Image
Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





Since we are in the midst of Hanukkah, I thought it would be a great time to feature some Jewish words and terms on Editing for Grammarphobes today. 



Judaism

According to the Associated Press Stylebook 2016 (AP), "Jews believe the divine kingdom will be established on Earth, opening a messianic era that will be marked with peace and bliss. They believe they have a mandate from God to work toward the kingdom.”

The spiritual leader of the synagogue (house of worship) is called a rabbi. The cantor leads the congregation in song. AP states these titles should be capitalized before an individual’s full name on first reference. On second reference, use only the last name.

There are no synods, assemblies, or hierarchies in Judaism. Each individual synagogue is autonomous. 

There are, ho…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: How Many Cupcakes in a Baker’s Dozen?

Image
Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?







The holiday season ushers in a flurry of activity—decorating, parties, shopping—but it wouldn’t be complete without the scent of something baking in the oven. So, today I thought we could tackle some baking words on Editing for Grammarphobes. 

For example, do you know the difference between a macaron and a macaroon?

Whether you are a food writer or not, you never know when you’ll need these words in a story, an article, or even an email.


All-purpose flour 

The name for general white, wheat flour that can be used for most baking.


Baker’s dozen

A baker’s dozen contains 13 items, not 12. 

According to Mental Floss, this custom dates back to the 13th century, when British bakers were “notorious for shorting customers with skimpy loaves. King Henry III was so irked by the problem that he imp…