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Showing posts from January, 2018

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Grammar Giggles

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





Can you believe January is over? We've covered a lot this month, from punctuation within quotation marks, to new AP and CMS rules, to an easy way to remember the I vs. Me rule, so let's wrap it up with a few grammar jokes. I think we deserve it. 














EFG Digest
Love all the grammar tips, but don’t have time to check the blog every week? Subscribe to EFG Digest, a monthly recap of all of my Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 blog posts delivered to your inbox in one convenient newsletter. Click here to sign up. Bio

A professional writer/editor for almost 30 years, Karen Wojcik Berner's wide and varied experience includes such topics as grammar, blog content, book reviews, corporate communications, the arts, paint and coatings, real estate, the fire service, writing and literature,…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: A Simple Rule to Remember Me Versus I

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



Here's a question I received from Jeanette.

Karen, wanted to let you know I enjoy your blog posts, especially the ones that deal with grammar. So many words can be tricky, and, as a writer, I don't want to jar my reader by using the wrong word. When I read something that isn't correct, it throws me off. I particularly liked "me versus I," which I see used incorrectly all the time. Perhaps I missed it, but do you have a simple rule we can remember to avoid using the wrong word? 

I think I have it down, but here is an example I'm not sure about. Which is correct: "He is taller than me" or "He is taller than I?" This suggests that the rest of the sentence is "am tall." It seems both are correct. Are they? 

Thank for your kind wo…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Single Quotation Marks Within Double Quotes: Where Does the Period Go?

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Posted byKAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



I received an email from Leah Rae with a question about punctuation in relation to closing quotation marks. 
My question is punctuation. I know how to use double quotes. Period, then last quotation mark. But when you have a word or two in single quotes, does the same hold true? Looks wrong not to have period outside last single quote. Thanks.

Leah Rae, thanks for your email. It can get a little confusing, especially if you read British novels, which have their own quotation mark rules that aren’t similar to American English. We’re lucky with this one because, for once, the Chicago Manual of Style and the Associated Press Stylebook both use the same rule.

Periods and commas should always be within quotation marks, regardless of whether they are used within single or double quotes.

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Scanning Through CMS

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) doesn’t update nearly as much as the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style). Seven years have passed between the last edition and the most recent, which was released in September.
The new CMS features many updates, additions, and clarifications, chief among the grammar and editing rules is making the “i” in internet lowercase and dropping the hyphen from email as AP Style does. (For a full list of updates, click here.)
While I was paging through the volume, I noticed a few things in the “Word Usage” section that caught my eye. I thought I’d share them with you today.

Bombastic
Bombastic has nothing to do with temper. CMS states that “a bombastic speech or essay is pompously long-winded and self-important but essentially empty of substance.”

Between y…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: New Year, More New AP Style Rules

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?






The Greek philosopher Heraclitus of Ephesus (c. 535 B.C.-475 B.C.) is credited with the much-paraphrased statement that change is the only constant. It’s that way in life, and it most certainly holds true for languages. Words are added to the dictionary every year, and new situations arise that require written explanation.

Published in August, 1977, the first edition of the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) attempted to standardize how things would appear in newspapers and magazines across the U.S. The latest stylebook is the 52nd edition.

What’s New?

There are more than 200 new and modified entries. Some are evident in their reasoning, such as the new entry on gender-related terms and issues, while others merely feature a more-correct spelling, as in using kimchi when referr…