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Showing posts from February, 2018

Happy 1st Anniversary, EFG Digest

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POSTED BY KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?






It’s EFG Digest’s 1st Anniversary!

One year ago, I thought it might be a good idea to condense all of the monthly Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 posts into one convenient email for people who don’t have time to read the blog every week. I’m glad I did because EFG Digest is gaining more subscribers every month, and I’m truly happy to have another way to share these weekly grammar and writing tips.

To say thanks, I’m holding a Rafflecopter contest. The prize is a $25 Amazon gift card. To enter, all you have to do is join my Facebook page, follow me on Twitter, or tweet about the blog. The more you do, the more chances you’ll have to win. The contest form follows the weekly post.

Okay, now back to business.

It’s been awhile since I’ve focused on a specific letter of the alphabet. We…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Who vs. That

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POSTED BY KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





Jeanette wrote:

Perhaps sometime you could tackle who vs. what. More often than not, I see sentences like the following.

"The boy that lives nearby…"

Isn’t it supposed to be this instead?

"The boy who lives nearby…"

My thought is that who should come after a person and that should come after a thing. No one seems to follow this, however. Is that becoming correct?


I’ve been hearing that used a lot more lately when referring to people as well, Jeanette, but it’s still not right.

Who is the pronoun that is supposed to be used in reference to human beings.

That may refer to people, animals, groups, or things, but who is still preferred when referring to people, according to numerous grammar sites.

While you’re on this topic, you might also like to read “That vs. Which”

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: A Bibliophilic Valentine's Day

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POSTED BYKAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





How did Valentine’s Day come about? No one really knows for certain.
The story I heard growing up was Valentine was a priest who served in Rome around the third century. When Emperor Claudius II decreed that single men made the best soldiers, far better than those with wives, he banned marriage among his troops. Valentine defied the decree and performed secret marriages for young lovers. When Claudius found out, Valentine was put to death. 
A riff on that story is that the imprisoned Valentine might have sent the very first valentine message to the jailor’s daughter with whom he became smitten and signed it “From your Valentine.” So much for a vow of chastity. However, this legend spread and became popular throughout England and France during the Middle Ages. 
I read a few articl…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Vocabulary Building

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER



Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?




I am a word nerd. In high school, I would memorize the vocabulary lists, making sure to incorporate at least one of those words in my writing each week. This is how insipid, plethora, and a myriad of other words entered by vocabulary, including myriad itself.

Have you ever read a dictionary? Whenever I edit, I often end up reading a few pages before or after my initial inquiry. It's fascinating.

For instance, do you know what the following five words mean?

Alacrity

Alacrity means "promptness in response, a cheerful readiness."

Didactic

Didactic is an adjective used to describe something that is "designed or intended to teach, or the intended to convey instruction and information, as well as pleasure and entertainment." It also can mean making moral observations.