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Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Christianity Edition

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POSTED BY KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





Since Sunday is Easter for Christians around the globe, I thought it would be a good time to cover some words and traditions that are specific to Christianity. We've already covered Judaism for Hannukah and Islam for Eid and in previous posts.

One of the Abrahamic monotheistic religions, Christianity is based on the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth. Christians believe that Jesus, or Christ, is the son of God and a savior of those who believe in him. The world’s largest religion, it has more than 2.4 billion followers.

The three main branches of Christianity are Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodox. The other denominations include Anglican (or Church of England), Baptist, Church of Christ, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (or Mormons), Coptic, Easte…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Italics or Not?

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POSTED BY KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?





When referring to movies or books in your writing, do you put quotation marks around the titles or should they be italicized?

Do you capitalize all of the words and articles in a title? 


What about a particular song in a part of an album, opera, or symphony?

How about paintings? Video games? Television shows? Plays?

What if your character is watching Modern Family or playing Fortnite?




What do I do with the articles?

Well, it depends what you are writing. 

In all cases, the main words of the title should be capitalized. Do not capitalize articles, such as a, and, the, or an, unless they are the first word of the work’s title. Nothing should appear in full caps but acronyms, such as computer programming languages or association names.




Magazines or newspapers

If you're writ…

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: Red-Flag Words

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?




Everybody has them. No matter how many times you write or type these words, you pause for a second.

Hmmm…does that look right? 

Here is a list of words to watch out for, all of which should set off a wee alarm in your head while you edit your work.


Red-Flag Words

Desperate (not desparate)


Disastrous (not disasterous)


Explanation (not explaination)


Fourth (not forth for the number placement)


Harass


Embarrass (Go figure?!? Why would harass have one “r” and embarrass two?)


Miscellaneous (Using misc. is not appropriate and does not let you off the hook.)


Privilege (not priviledge)


One of mine is vacuum. One "u" or two? Is it "cc" or not? I never know.


What are some words you just can't seem to remember how to spell?




EFG Digest
Love all the grammar tips, but don’t …

Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0: One Word or Two?

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Posted by KAREN WOJCIK BERNER


Every Wednesday, Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0 features handy tips to enhance all of our writing, from daily emails to articles to books. After all, everyone needs to write, right?



Do you have those words that, no matter how hard you try, you just can't remember if they are supposed to be one word or two? The ones that don't look right, even after spell checker assures they've been typed correctly? Here are a few I routinely look up.


Awhile vs. a while


This one is tricky, in that awhile is an adverb, and a while is a noun phrase meaning “length of time.”

She plans to be in England awhile.

She plans to stay in England for a while.


Breakup vs. break up


Breakup is a noun meaning the dissolving of a relationship. Break up is the verb form.

The breakup hurt Missy more than she had thought.

Riot police could not break up the protests in the downtown streets.


Cannot vs. can not


Although technically both forms may be used, cannot is more accepted in modern langua…

Read an E-book Week

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POSTED BY KAREN WOJCIK BERNER




It's Read an E-book Week!

About 25% of bibliophiles regularly use some form of e-reader, whether it be Kindle, Nook, Kobo, iPad, or iPhone. Smashwords has a huge promotion going on now that includes deep discounts on many of your favorite e-books, including mine.

For this week only, A WHISPER TO A SCREAM and A BIBLIOPHILE CHRISTMAS are both free. UNTIL MY SOUL GETS IT RIGHT and A GROOVY KIND OF LOVE are only $1. That's a lot of reading pleasure for very little money. Click here to go directly to the Bibliophiles promotion.

So, grab an e-book today, and I'll see you Wednesday for Editing for Grammarphobes 2.0.

Karen